From Shame to Game in One Hundred Years: An Economic Model of the Rise in Premarital Sex and its De-Stigmatization

Journal of the European Economic Association, Forthcoming

Economie d’Avant Garde Research Report No. 16

57 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2008 Last revised: 7 Mar 2013

See all articles by Jesús Fernández-Villaverde

Jesús Fernández-Villaverde

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Jeremy Greenwood

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Nezih Guner

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 3 versions of this paper

Date Written: March 6, 2013

Abstract

Societies socialize children about sex. This is done in the presence of peer-group effects, which may encourage undesirable behavior. Parents want the best for their children. Still, they weigh the marginal gains from socializing their children against its costs. Churches and states may stigmatize sex, both because of a concern about the welfare of their flocks and the need to control the cost of charity associated with out-of-wedlock births. Modern contraceptives have profoundly affected the calculus for instilling sexual mores. As contraception has improved there is less need for parents, churches and states to inculcate sexual mores. Technology affects culture.

Keywords: Add Health, contraception, culture, peer group effects, premarital sex, shame, socialization, stigma, technological progress

JEL Classification: D58, J13, O15, N30

Suggested Citation

Fernández-Villaverde, Jesús and Greenwood, Jeremy and Guner, Nezih, From Shame to Game in One Hundred Years: An Economic Model of the Rise in Premarital Sex and its De-Stigmatization (March 6, 2013). Journal of the European Economic Association, Forthcoming; Economie d’Avant Garde Research Report No. 16. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1313185

Jesús Fernández-Villaverde

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics ( email )

3718 Locust Walk
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Jeremy Greenwood

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Economics ( email )

Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science
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National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

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Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Nezih Guner (Contact Author)

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid ( email )

CL. de Madrid 126
Madrid, Madrid 28903
Spain

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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