'I' Before 'E', Except in Mediation: Training Introverts to Use Extroverted Techniques to Become Stronger Mediators

16 Pages Posted: 11 Dec 2008 Last revised: 5 Jan 2011

Kelly Lynn Anders

Jackson County Law Library, Inc.

Date Written: December 8, 2008

Abstract

Little research has been conducted on the personality types of law professors and others who train law students and lawyers to work as mediators, but if the assessments of attorneys and students are any indication, it is likely that professors and other instructors probably tend to fall into the "introvert" category. As a result, several questions arise. How important is a feelings-centered approach in order to be an effective mediator? Can introverts teach other introverts to behave as extroverts? Which traits of introverts and extroverts are most valuable for mediators to possess? And, can a mediator be sensitive to the parties' feelings on either side and remain neutral?
This article discusses traits of introverts and extroverts, provides examples of mediation training techniques that strengthen the extroverted traits most beneficial for effective mediators, and concludes by suggesting methods for law schools and other mediation training programs to consider in developing students into mediators with balanced introverted and extroverted skills.

Keywords: Dispute Resolution, Mediation, Introvert, Extrovert, Myers-Briggs, Skills Training

Suggested Citation

Anders, Kelly Lynn, 'I' Before 'E', Except in Mediation: Training Introverts to Use Extroverted Techniques to Become Stronger Mediators (December 8, 2008). Oklahoma City University Law Review, Vol. 33, No. 2, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1313344

Kelly Lynn Anders (Contact Author)

Jackson County Law Library, Inc. ( email )

1301 Oak Street, Suite 310
Kansas City, MO 64106
(816) 221-2221 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.jcll.org

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