Commercializing Air Traffic Control: Have the Reforms Worked?

Canadian Public Administration, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 45-69, 2009

39 Pages Posted: 19 Dec 2008 Last revised: 18 May 2016

See all articles by Glen McDougall

Glen McDougall

MBS Ottawa Inc.; AirNeth

Alasdair S. Roberts

University of Massachusetts Amherst - School of Public Policy

Date Written: August 15, 2007

Abstract

Air Navigation Service Providers (ANSPs) play a critical role in the operation of a modern economy. Many countries have restructured their ANSPs by granting managerial and financial autonomy, and creating new mechanisms for regulation and accountability to major consumers of air navigation services. These reforms have exemplified principles often associated with the New Public Management. The United States is the major exception to this international trend. Commercialization has allowed significant improvements in service quality without substantial increases in cost of service, or erosion of safety standards. Other public interest considerations have also been protected. These performance benefits can be attributed to key decisions on the governance of new ANS organizations.

Keywords: commercialization, privatization, air navigation service providers, air traffic control, New Public Management

Suggested Citation

McDougall, Glen and Roberts, Alasdair S., Commercializing Air Traffic Control: Have the Reforms Worked? (August 15, 2007). Canadian Public Administration, Vol. 51, No. 1, pp. 45-69, 2009 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1317450

Glen McDougall (Contact Author)

MBS Ottawa Inc. ( email )

130 Stonewater Bay
Carleton Place, Ontario K7C0B1
Canada

AirNeth ( email )

Spui 21
Amsterdam, 1018 WB
Netherlands

Alasdair S. Roberts

University of Massachusetts Amherst - School of Public Policy ( email )

Thompson Hall
Amherst, MA 01003
United States
6175999029 (Phone)

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