Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

'Implicit Good Faith' - or Do We Still Need an Implied Term of Good Faith?

Journal of Contract Law, Vol. 25, 2009

Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 09/01

17 Pages Posted: 9 Mar 2009  

Elisabeth Peden

The University of Sydney Law School

Date Written: January 12, 2009

Abstract

Implied terms of good faith in relation to express contractual rights and discretions have been the focus of recent litigation in England and Australia. These rights and discretions appear in commercial contracts, where consumer legislation is not relevant and the only possible fetter on the exercise of these rights and discretions would be found in common law or equitable doctrines. From the recent cases, the two likely fetters on rights and discretions are good faith and reasonableness. With those two fetters seem to arise two areas of confusion: (a) the meaning of those terms and (b) the method of incorporation. This paper considers those issues and offers 'implicit' good faith as the solution.

Keywords: contract law, good faith, implied terms, reasonableness, discretions, termination rights

JEL Classification: K10, K12, K30, K41

Suggested Citation

Peden, Elisabeth, 'Implicit Good Faith' - or Do We Still Need an Implied Term of Good Faith? (January 12, 2009). Journal of Contract Law, Vol. 25, 2009; Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 09/01. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1326690

Elisabeth Peden (Contact Author)

The University of Sydney Law School ( email )

New Law Building, F10
The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW 2006
Australia

Paper statistics

Downloads
778
Rank
25,481
Abstract Views
2,685