Testing the Implicit-Explicit Model of Racialized Political Communication

Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 125-134, 2008

Posted: 29 Jan 2009

See all articles by Gregory Huber

Gregory Huber

Yale University - Department of Political Science

John S. Lapinski

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Political Science

Date Written: January 27, 2009

Abstract

The Implicit-Explicit (IE) model of racial priming posits that implicitly racial messages will be more effective than explicitly racial ones in priming racial predispositions in opinion formation. Is the Implicit-Explicit model supported by existing data? In "Racial Priming Revived,"Mendelberg responds to our analysis of a pair of experiments in which we found that "that implicit appeals are no more effective than explicit ones in priming racial resentment in opinion formation." In this note we demonstrate that the concerns raised about our experiments are unfounded. Further, we show that the existing work supporting the IE model suffers from serious limitations of experimental design and implementation. Cumulatively, we find that the evidence questioning the IE model is far stronger than the evidence that supports it.

Keywords: Field experiments, randomization, racial priming, opinion formation

JEL Classification: C93

Suggested Citation

Huber, Gregory and Lapinski, John S., Testing the Implicit-Explicit Model of Racialized Political Communication (January 27, 2009). Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp. 125-134, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1333668

Gregory Huber (Contact Author)

Yale University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Box 208269
New Haven, DC 06520-8269
United States

John S. Lapinski

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Political Science ( email )

Stiteler Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

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