Changing the Neo-Colonial Impacts of Juvenile Justice

Current Issues in Criminal Justice, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 43-58, 2008

17 Pages Posted: 29 Jan 2009 Last revised: 18 Jul 2013

See all articles by Chris Cunneen

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney; James Cook University - Cairns Campus

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

While there have been some progressive changes in Australia juvenile justice in recent years including developments in youth justice conferencing, more consistent and widely available diversionary options, and a longer term decline in juvenile incarceration rates, these changes have not tended to affect the contact of Indigenous young people with the justice system. The paper analyses why more punitive approaches to law and order (such as a greater reliance on custodial remand) and a greater bifurcation between less serious offenders and repeat offenders is having a particularly negative impact on Indigenous youth. It concludes with a consideration of some of the more promising developments concerning Indigenous young people in youth justice.

Keywords: Neo-colonialism, indigenous, juvenile justice, Australia

JEL Classification: K00

Suggested Citation

Cunneen, Chris, Changing the Neo-Colonial Impacts of Juvenile Justice (2008). Current Issues in Criminal Justice, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 43-58, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1334383

Chris Cunneen (Contact Author)

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

James Cook University - Cairns Campus ( email )

PO Box 6811
Cairns, Queensland 4870
Australia

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