'The Time vs. Money Effect': Shifting Product Attitudes and Decisions through Personal Connection

15 Pages Posted: 5 Feb 2009 Last revised: 5 Apr 2012

See all articles by Cassie Mogilner

Cassie Mogilner

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Anderson School of Management

Jennifer Aaker

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business

Date Written: August 1, 2009

Abstract

The results of five field and laboratory experiments reveal a "time vs. money effect" whereby activating time (vs. money) leads to a favorable shift in product attitudes and decisions. Because time increases focus on product experience, activating time (vs. money) augments one's personal connection with the product, thereby boosting attitudes and decisions. However, because money increases focus on product possession, the reverse effect can occur in cases where merely owning the product reflects the self (i.e., for prestige possessions, or for highly materialistic consumers). The "time vs. money effect" proves robust across implicit and explicit methods of construct activation. Implications for research on the psychology of time and money are discussed.

Keywords: attitudes, time, money

Suggested Citation

Mogilner, Cassie and Aaker, Jennifer Lynn, 'The Time vs. Money Effect': Shifting Product Attitudes and Decisions through Personal Connection (August 1, 2009). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 36, 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1337113

Cassie Mogilner (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Anderson School of Management ( email )

110 Westwood Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1481
United States

Jennifer Lynn Aaker

Stanford University - Graduate School of Business ( email )

655 Knight Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5015
United States

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