(In)visible Cities: Three Local Government Models and Immigration Regulation

Oregon Review of International Law, Vol. 10, p. 453, 2008

UC Davis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 168

79 Pages Posted: 21 Feb 2009 Last revised: 12 Jun 2013

See all articles by Keith Aoki

Keith Aoki

University of California, Davis - School of Law

John Shuford

Portland State University Conflict Resolution Program; Royal Roads University School of Humanitarian Studies

Kristy Young

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Thomas Hwei

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Abstract

This article looks at the aporetic role of cities in the context of globalization. Cities are legally invisible on both the international and domestic level, yet they are playing increasingly important roles in areas such as anthropogenic climate change, human rights and immigration. This article looks at ways that cities in the U.S. have undertaken to regulate undocumented immigrants, heightening tensions between the federal government's role in regulating entry and deportation of noncitizens and the ability of state and local governments to specify rules for residents within their boundaries. This article uses three competing and overlapping models of local government power to analyze actions undertaken by the city of Hazleton, Pennsylania to impose penalties on landlords who don't verify the legal staus of tenants they rent to or employers who employ undocumented immigrants. Finally, this article argues that restructuring local government rules to help (rather than hurt) the integration of undocumented immigrants provides a chance for second-order immigration regulations to supplement, rather than thwart, federal immigration objectives.

Keywords: local government law, immigration, immigration federalism, noncitizen voting, Language regulation, Sanctuary cities

Suggested Citation

Aoki, Keith and Shuford, John and Young, Kristy and Hwei, Thomas, (In)visible Cities: Three Local Government Models and Immigration Regulation. Oregon Review of International Law, Vol. 10, p. 453, 2008; UC Davis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 168. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1347161

Keith Aoki (Contact Author)

University of California, Davis - School of Law ( email )

Martin Luther King, Jr. Hall
Davis, CA CA 95616-5201
United States

John Shuford

Portland State University Conflict Resolution Program ( email )

Portland
United States

Royal Roads University School of Humanitarian Studies ( email )

2005 Sooke Road
Victoria, British Columbia V9B 5Y2
Canada

Kristy Young

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Thomas Hwei

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
282
Abstract Views
2,446
rank
107,762
PlumX Metrics