A Disciple Becomes the Guru

Harvard International Review, Fall 2008

4 Pages Posted: 26 Feb 2009  

Vivek Wadhwa

Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization, Pratt School of Engineering; Stanford University - Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance

Date Written: October 15, 2008

Abstract

Despite its low rates of postgraduate science and engineering graduation, India is rapidly becoming a global hub for R&D, with a momentum and scale similar to those it accomplished in IT services.

If engineering education is so critical to global competitiveness, how is India succeeding? To answer this, we met with the CEOs, human-resource directors, R&D leaders, managers, and employees, and visited the R&D and training facilities of 24 leading companies in India. These were in rapidly growing emerging sectors, including IT services, business-process outsourcing, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, financial services, retail, hospitality, and education - all of which have managed to grow and innovate despite skills gaps and talent shortages.

We identified seven key areas in which Indian companies have developed innovative practices: employee recruitment, new employee training, continuing employee development, managerial training and development, performance management and appraisal, workforce retention, and education upgrades.

Keywords: India, workforce development, management, globalization

Suggested Citation

Wadhwa, Vivek, A Disciple Becomes the Guru (October 15, 2008). Harvard International Review, Fall 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1349457

Vivek Wadhwa (Contact Author)

Center for Entrepreneurship and Research Commercialization, Pratt School of Engineering ( email )

Durham, NC 27708
United States

Stanford University - Arthur & Toni Rembe Rock Center for Corporate Governance ( email )

Crown Quadrangle 559 Nathan Ab
Stanford, CA 94305-8610
United States

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