The Long-Term Cost of the Financial Crisis

6 Pages Posted: 12 Mar 2009

See all articles by Murillo Campello

Murillo Campello

Cornell University - Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

John R. Graham

Duke University; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Campbell R. Harvey

Duke University - Fuqua School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative

Date Written: March 11, 2009

Abstract

The focus of the current credit crisis is on the immediate implications, such as reduced profits and increased unemployment. In contrast, we show that there are worrisome long-term economic consequences of the crisis through its effect on financially constrained firms. Using a survey of over 1,000 CFOs in the United States, Europe and Asia, we show that firms are cutting back or canceling projects that they know add to firm value. The elimination of profitable projects is especially acute for firms that face financial constraints. One of the basic tenets of finance is that projects that enhance firm value should be pursued. Financial constraints potentially prevent the funding of these projects. The current credit crisis is an ideal setting to measure the impact of constraints on value creation. Turning down or canceling profitable projects is a lesser known cost of the current financial crisis. Our evidence suggests that in the scramble for short-term cash flow, firms are sacrificing long-term value. This implies lower future growth opportunities and lower future employment growth.

Keywords: Financial crisis, financing constraints, investment spending, liquidity management, matching estimators

JEL Classification: G31

Suggested Citation

Campello, Murillo and Graham, John Robert and Harvey, Campbell R., The Long-Term Cost of the Financial Crisis (March 11, 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1357806 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1357806

Murillo Campello (Contact Author)

Cornell University - Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management ( email )

114 East Avenue
369 Sage Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.johnson.cornell.edu/Faculty-And-Research/Profile.aspx?id=mnc35

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138

John Robert Graham

Duke University ( email )

Box 90120
Durham, NC 27708-0120
United States
919-660-7857 (Phone)
919-660-8030 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Campbell R. Harvey

Duke University - Fuqua School of Business ( email )

Box 90120
Durham, NC 27708-0120
United States
919-660-7768 (Phone)
919-660-8030 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Duke Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative ( email )

215 Morris St., Suite 300
Durham, NC 27701
United States

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
850
rank
26,270
Abstract Views
3,523
PlumX Metrics