To Compete or to Cooperate? This is an Impact Assessment Question

Posted: 19 Mar 2009

See all articles by Ragnar Lofstedt

Ragnar Lofstedt

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Jacopo Torriti

University of Surrey - Centre for Environmental Strategy

Date Written: March 18, 2009

Abstract

There is a fine line between regulatory competition and cooperation across the Atlantic. Whilst U.S. and European Union (EU) increasingly collaborate on a range of specific regulatory areas in an effort to remove tariff barriers and thus facilitate trade flows of about 620 billion Euros per year, they also compete in order to improve their internal markets, attract a higher number of investors, increase safety for their citizens and maintaining acceptable environmental standards. When measuring the temperature of regulatory competition and cooperation between U.S. and the EU, a valid reading key is Impact Assessment (IA). IA is the main evidence-based policy-making instrument in place in both U.S. and EU and can help understand the rationales and justifications for policy and regulatory interventions. The two conflicting approaches - competition versus cooperation - will be examined in this chapter, which aims to provide a framework for analysing the level of regulatory cooperation and competition through an analysis of the existing IA systems in the two continents.

Keywords: Better Regulation, European Union, Impact Assessment, Office of Management and Budget, regulatory co-operation

JEL Classification: F02, F42

Suggested Citation

Lofstedt, Ragnar and Torriti, Jacopo, To Compete or to Cooperate? This is an Impact Assessment Question (March 18, 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1363911

Ragnar Lofstedt

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Jacopo Torriti (Contact Author)

University of Surrey - Centre for Environmental Strategy ( email )

University of Surrey
Guildford, GU2 7XH
United Kingdom

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