Increasingly Heterogeneous Ages at First Birth by Education in 'Conservative' Southern-European and 'Liberal' Anglo-American Family-Policy Regimes

49 Pages Posted: 2 Apr 2009

See all articles by Michael S. Rendall

Michael S. Rendall

RAND Corporation

Encarnacion Aracil

Complutense University of Madrid

Christos Bagavos

Panteion University of Athens - Panteion University of Political and Social Sciences

Christine Couet

National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE)

Alessandra DeRose

University of Rome I

Paola DiGiulio

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Trude Lappegard

Statistics Norway

Isabelle Robert-Bobee

National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE); National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) - Center for Research in Economics and Statistics (CREST)

Marit Rønsen

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Steve Smallwood

Government of the United Kingdom - Office for National Statistics

Georgia Verropoulou

University of Piraeus

Date Written: March 27, 2009

Abstract

The claim that family-policy regime may influence socio-economic differentials in fertility has to date been explored mainly with respect to 'liberal' Anglo-American regimes. The authors broaden the contrast with 'family-friendly' regimes here to include in the 'family-unfriendly' group 'conservative' Southern European regimes. Comparing education differentials in age at first birth, they find educationally-heterogeneous shifts between 1950s and 1960s birth cohorts of women in Greece, Italy, and Spain. The patterns of these shifts are similar to those seen for British and American birth cohorts, and contrast with educationally-homogeneous shifts across birth cohorts in Norway and France. They argue that these findings support the hypothesis that the role of family-policy regime in mediating growth in socio-economic differentials in fertility has increased as combining employment and family has become more normative among women throughout industrialized countries.

Suggested Citation

Rendall, Michael S. and Aracil, Encarnacion and Bagavos, Christos and Couet, Christine and DeRose, Alessandra and DiGiulio, Paola and Lappegard, Trude and Robert-Bobee, Isabelle and Rønsen, Marit and Smallwood, Steve and Verropoulou, Georgia, Increasingly Heterogeneous Ages at First Birth by Education in 'Conservative' Southern-European and 'Liberal' Anglo-American Family-Policy Regimes (March 27, 2009). RAND Working Paper Series No. WR- 676, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1369358 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1369358

Michael S. Rendall (Contact Author)

RAND Corporation ( email )

1776 Main Street
P.O. Box 2138
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
United States

Encarnacion Aracil

Complutense University of Madrid ( email )

Facultad de Ciencias Políticas y Sociología
Campus de Somosaguas
Madrid, Madrid 28223
Spain
34 91 394 30 50 (Phone)
34 91 394 26 73 (Fax)

Christos Bagavos

Panteion University of Athens - Panteion University of Political and Social Sciences ( email )

136 Sygrou
Athens
Greece

Christine Couet

National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) ( email )

18, Boulevard Adolphe-Pinard
92244 Malakoff Cedex
France

Alessandra DeRose

University of Rome I ( email )

Piazzale Aldo Moro 5
Roma, Rome 00185
Italy

Paola DiGiulio

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Trude Lappegard

Statistics Norway ( email )

N-0033 Oslo
Norway

Isabelle Robert-Bobee

National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) ( email )

18, Boulevard Adolphe-Pinard
75675 Paris Cedex 14
France

National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies (INSEE) - Center for Research in Economics and Statistics (CREST)

15 Boulevard Gabriel Peri
Malakoff Cedex, 1 92245
France

Marit Rønsen

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Steve Smallwood

Government of the United Kingdom - Office for National Statistics ( email )

London, SW1A 2AA
United Kingdom

Georgia Verropoulou

University of Piraeus ( email )

Karaoli and Dimitriou 80
80 KARAOLI & DIMITRIOU STREET
Piraeus, Attiki 18534
Greece

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
31
Abstract Views
744
PlumX Metrics