Dynamical Jurisprudence: Law as a Complex System

11 Pages Posted: 31 Mar 2009 Last revised: 9 Apr 2009

Gregory Todd Jones

University of Georgia - Terry College of Business; Georgia State University - Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution; Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods

Date Written: February 19, 2008

Abstract

There is a small, but growing cadre of legal scholars who think that it would be worthwhile to consider the implications of networks, complex systems, and nonlinear dynamics to the future of the law. The breadth of current substantive applications is impressive, including jurisprudence, law and economics, torts, criminal law, environmental law, regulatory law, bankruptcy, mediation and other forms of alternative dispute resolution, administrative law, capital markets, telecommunications, legislative and judicial decision making, discrimination and equal opportunity, constitutional law, business law, land use law, intellectual property, and political theory - and this is surely not a complete list. In this Symposium edition of the Georgia State University Law Review, we are fortunate to have contributions from many of the pioneers in the application of complex systems and dynamical systems theory to the law.

Suggested Citation

Jones, Gregory Todd, Dynamical Jurisprudence: Law as a Complex System (February 19, 2008). Georgia State University Law Review, Vol. 24, No. 4, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1370527

Gregory Todd Jones (Contact Author)

University of Georgia - Terry College of Business ( email )

Brooks Hall
Athens, GA 30602-6254
United States

Georgia State University - Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution ( email )

PO Box 4037
Atlanta, GA 30302-4037
United States

Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods ( email )

Kurt-Schumacher-Str. 10
D-53113 Bonn, 53113
Germany

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