Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-Being

33 Pages Posted: 27 Apr 2009

See all articles by Mark Wooden

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Diana Warren

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Robert W. Drago

Pennsylvania State University - Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations

Abstract

This study uses nationally representative panel survey data for Australia to identify the role played by mismatches between hours actually worked and working time preferences in contributing to reported levels of job and life satisfaction. Three main conclusions emerge. First, it is not the number of hours worked that matters for subjective well-being, but working time mismatch. Second, overemployment is a more serious problem than is underemployment. Third, while the magnitude of the impact of overemployment may seem small in absolute terms, relative to other variables, such as disability, the effect is quite large.

Suggested Citation

Wooden, Mark and Warren, Diana and Drago, Robert W., Working Time Mismatch and Subjective Well-Being. British Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 47, Issue 1, pp. 147-179, March 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1375849 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2008.00705.x

Mark Wooden (Contact Author)

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Diana Warren

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

Robert W. Drago

Pennsylvania State University - Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations ( email )

University Park, PA 16802
United States
814-865-0751 (Phone)
814-863-3578 (Fax)

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