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Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies, and the Future of Human Intelligence

Posted: 15 Apr 2009  

Leslie Marsh

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: April 15, 2009

Abstract

The notion of the cyborg has exercised the popular imagination for almost two hundred years. In very general terms the idea that a living entity can be a hybrid of both organic matter and mechanical parts, and for all intents and purposes be seamlessly functional and self-regulating, as prefigured in literary works such as Shelly's Frankenstein (1816/18) and Samuel Butler's Erewhon (1872). This notion of hybridism has been a staple theme of 20th century science fiction writing, television programmes and the cinema. For the most part, these works trade on a deep sense of unease we have about our personal identity - how could some non-organic matter to which I have so little conscious access count as a bona fide part of me? Cognitive scientist and philosopher, Andy Clark, picks up this general theme and presents an empirical and philosophical case for the following inextricably linked theses.

Keywords: clark, cyborgs, extended mind

Suggested Citation

Marsh, Leslie, Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies, and the Future of Human Intelligence (April 15, 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1382642

Leslie Marsh (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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