Tribal Membership and 'Indian Status': Federal Indian Law in the Post-Martinez World

Native Americas, Vol. 19, 2002

5 Pages Posted: 9 May 2009

See all articles by Rebecca A. Tsosie

Rebecca A. Tsosie

University of Arizona - James E. Rogers College of Law

Date Written: 2002

Abstract

In this article, Professor Tsosie describes the importance of legally establishing Indian status or tribal membership for purposes of federal Indian law. She also explores the decision making process and who determines Indian status. Ultimately, recognition of Indian status or tribal membership affect tribal sovereignty and Native peoples cultural perspectives. Additionally, these matters significantly impact Indian law jurisprudence. Professor Tsosie refers to a particular important case, Santa Clara Pueblo v. Martinez, to demonstrate how the Supreme Court decided on issues of Indian status. Professor Tsosie concludes that usually the federal government relies on individual tribes to determine membership and status.

Keywords: Indian status, Tribal membership, Native people

Suggested Citation

Tsosie, Rebecca A., Tribal Membership and 'Indian Status': Federal Indian Law in the Post-Martinez World (2002). Native Americas, Vol. 19, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1401524

Rebecca A. Tsosie (Contact Author)

University of Arizona - James E. Rogers College of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 210176
Tucson, AZ 85721-0176
United States

HOME PAGE: https://law.arizona.edu/rebecca-tsosie

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