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Trial Selection Theory and Evidence: A Review

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LAW AND ECONOMICS: PROCEDURAL LAW AND ECONOMICS, Chris Sanchirico, ed., Vol. X, Edward Elgar Publishing

Boston Univ. School of Law Working Paper No. 09-27

28 Pages Posted: 20 May 2009 Last revised: 13 May 2014

Keith N. Hylton

Boston University - School of Law

Haizhen Lin

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Economics & Public Policy

Date Written: May 20, 2009

Abstract

Trial selection theory consists of models that attempt to explain or predict the characteristics that distinguish cases that are litigated to judgment from those that settle, and the implications of those characteristics for the development of legal doctrine and for important trial outcome parameters, such as the plaintiff win rate. This paper presents a review of trial selection theory and evidence. We start with a review of the literature, and then present a model that includes Priest-Klein and asymmetric information theories as special cases. We conclude with a review of the empirical evidence.

Keywords: trial selection theory, trial outcome, plaintiff win rate, Priest-Klein model, Landes-Posner-Gould settlement model

Suggested Citation

Hylton, Keith N. and Lin, Haizhen, Trial Selection Theory and Evidence: A Review (May 20, 2009). ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LAW AND ECONOMICS: PROCEDURAL LAW AND ECONOMICS, Chris Sanchirico, ed., Vol. X, Edward Elgar Publishing; Boston Univ. School of Law Working Paper No. 09-27. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1407557

Keith Hylton (Contact Author)

Boston University - School of Law ( email )

765 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
United States
617-353-8959 (Phone)
617-353-3077 (Fax)

Haizhen Lin

Indiana University - Kelley School of Business - Department of Business Economics & Public Policy ( email )

Bloomington, IN 47405
United States

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