Does the Wall Still Stand? The Implications of Transhumanism for the Separation of Church and State

Speech at the Workshop on Transhumanism and the Future of Democracy, Templeton Research Lectures at the Arizona State University Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, April 24, 2009

Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 09-10

7 Pages Posted: 27 May 2009  

Steven Goldberg

Georgetown University - Law Center (Deceased)

Date Written: May 22, 2009

Abstract

Suppose a required course in a public high school taught transhumanism. The course covered topics such as how nanotechnology can improve brain functioning, and it took a positive, optimistic perspective on the possibility that we can become posthuman beings. Would such a course constitute an unconstitutional establishment of religion? The Malnak test and other sources suggest that the answer might be yes. From the perspective of a non-transhumanist, it seems that it would be honest and sensible for transhumanists to embrace the idea that they offer an alternative to traditional religions.

Keywords: transhumanism, Establishment Clause, Malnak v. Yogi, definition of religion

Suggested Citation

Goldberg, Steven, Does the Wall Still Stand? The Implications of Transhumanism for the Separation of Church and State (May 22, 2009). Speech at the Workshop on Transhumanism and the Future of Democracy, Templeton Research Lectures at the Arizona State University Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, April 24, 2009; Georgetown Public Law Research Paper No. 09-10. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1408586

Steven Paul Goldberg (Contact Author)

Georgetown University - Law Center (Deceased)

N/A

Paper statistics

Downloads
102
Rank
215,439
Abstract Views
528