Stakeholder Reporting: The Role of Intermediaries

34 Pages Posted: 1 Jun 2009

See all articles by Pamela Stapleton

Pamela Stapleton

University of Manchester - Division of Accounting and Finance

David Woodward

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Abstract

Corporate social responsibility encompasses a multiplicity of different concepts, such that its nature is confused, and it remains difficult to operationalize because opening dialogue with and responding to the various expectations of diverse stakeholders is beyond the capacity of many companies. This paper adapts Mayston's normative “information beneficiaries” framework and focuses on intermediaries who might potentially use published financial information to open a restricted form of dialogue with companies, which might benefit unsophisticated stakeholders. The paper examines the Mayston framework using interviews conducted in organizations that might act on behalf of three stakeholder groups associated with gas and electricity suppliers in the United Kingdom, these being: consumers, employees, and the environment. While a long chain of communication exists between utility company and stakeholder, and many organizations do not fulfill their full potential as information intermediaries, there is some evidence that Mayston's framework might well operate in practice.

Suggested Citation

Stapleton, Pam and Woodward, David, Stakeholder Reporting: The Role of Intermediaries. Business and Society Review, Vol. 114, Issue 2, pp. 183-216, Summer 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1410883 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8594.2009.00340.x

Pam Stapleton (Contact Author)

University of Manchester - Division of Accounting and Finance ( email )

Crawford House
Oxford Road
Manchester M13 9PL
United Kingdom

David Woodward

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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