The Chicago School and the Evolution of Antitrust: Characterization, Antitrust Injury, and Evidentiary Sufficiency

Virginia Law Review, Vol. 75, p. 1221, 1989

89 Pages Posted: 4 Jun 2009

See all articles by William H. Page

William H. Page

University of Florida - Levin College of Law

Date Written: June 2, 2009

Abstract

This article, published in 1989, examines the influence of the Chicago School's antitrust paradigm on the evolution of antitrust law. It argues that courts have accepted many of the Chicago Schools positive models of practices like cartels, tying arrangements, and predatory pricing, but have been slower to adopt key elements of the Chicago School's policy program -- particularly rules of per se legality -- as substantive rules. The article identifies the primary influence of the Chicago School's models in subsidiary decisional contexts, particularly the characterization of practices as within or without established substantive rules; the determination of whether private harms from practices constitute antitrust injury; and in the determination of whether a plaintiff's evidence is sufficient to raise a triable issue of fact that a violation has occurred.

Keywords: antitrust, antitrust injury, summary judgment, Chicago School

JEL Classification: K21, K41, K42, L40, L41, L42

Suggested Citation

Page, William Hepburn, The Chicago School and the Evolution of Antitrust: Characterization, Antitrust Injury, and Evidentiary Sufficiency (June 2, 2009). Virginia Law Review, Vol. 75, p. 1221, 1989. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1413301

William Hepburn Page (Contact Author)

University of Florida - Levin College of Law ( email )

P.O. Box 117625
Gainesville, FL 32611-7625
United States

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