School Accountability Laws and the Consumption of Psychostimulants

45 Pages Posted: 3 Jun 2009 Last revised: 1 Jul 2015

See all articles by Farasat A. S. Bokhari

Farasat A. S. Bokhari

University of East Anglia (UEA) - School of Economic and Social Studies; University of East Anglia (UEA) - Centre for Competition Policy

Helen Schnedier

University of Texas at Austin

Date Written: March 8, 2008

Abstract

Over the past decade, several states introduced varying degrees of accountability systems for schools, which became federal law with the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The intent of these laws was to improve academic performance and to make school quality more observable. Nonetheless, schools have reacted to these pressures in several different ways, some of which were not intended. We make use of the variation across states and over time in specific provisions of these accountability laws and find that accountability laws effect medical diagnoses and subsequent treatment options of school aged children. Specifically, children in states with more stringent accountability laws are more likely to be diagnosed with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and consequently prescribed psychostimulant drugs for controlling the symptoms. However, conditional on diagnosis, accountability laws do not further change the probability of receiving medication therapy.

Last Revised: December 14, 2010

Keywords: Attention Decit Hyperactivity Disorder, ADD/ADHD, psychostimulants, school accountability laws

JEL Classification: I18, I28, H75

Suggested Citation

Bokhari, Farasat A. S. and Schnedier, Helen, School Accountability Laws and the Consumption of Psychostimulants (March 8, 2008). Journal of Health Economics, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1413883 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1413883

Farasat A. S. Bokhari (Contact Author)

University of East Anglia (UEA) - School of Economic and Social Studies ( email )

Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7TJ
United Kingdom

University of East Anglia (UEA) - Centre for Competition Policy ( email )

UEA
Norwich Research Park
Norwich, Norfolk NR47TJ
United Kingdom

Helen Schnedier

University of Texas at Austin ( email )

2317 Speedway
Austin, TX 78712
United States

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