Google and Internet Privacy (B)

Posted: 10 Jun 2009

See all articles by Jenny Mead

Jenny Mead

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Joan Denoncour

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Edward Heffernan

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Rahul Koranne

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Jake Marxen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Abstract

This case begins with the resolution of the A case (disturbed by the office reaction to him, Patton resigns), and then discusses the privacy issues in the situation from a Utilitarian and a Kantian perspective.

Excerpt

UVA-E-0345

Rev. Apr. 30, 2010

GOOGLE AND INTERNET PRIVACY (B)

Hours after he had been approached with the issue regarding Charlie Patton, Ken Winber was spared the need to act: Patton, whose shared computer had generated pop-up ads that led co-workers to secretly suspect he was HIV-positive, showed up at Winber's doorstep and tendered his resignation. Patton explained that, although he wasn't sure why, he sensed his colleagues had been avoiding him, so he no longer found the bank a comfortable place to work. Moreover, he had found another job that paid more. On hearing that last bit of news, Winber decided that further conversation was not necessary.

The term personal privacy can be difficult to define. Academics and social commentators have struggled not only with its definition but also its value.

In 1975, philosopher James Rachels argued that “people need to control information about themselves in order to maintain a diversity of relationships.” In other words, the amount of information a person shares with someone else is based on familiarity or intimacy: When meeting someone for the first time, we generally reveal very little personal information, but as relationships grow, we begin to share more and more. The information we choose to share or withhold creates varying levels of intimacy among our diverse relationships and fosters a sense of control.

. . .

Keywords: stakeholder management, ethical issues, ethics, privacy, internet, new technology, electronic monitoring

Suggested Citation

Mead, Jenny and Denoncour, Joan and Heffernan, Edward and Koranne, Rahul and Marxen, Jake, Google and Internet Privacy (B). Darden Case No. UVA-E-0345, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1417207

Jenny Mead (Contact Author)

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

Joan Denoncour

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Edward Heffernan

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

Rahul Koranne

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

Jake Marxen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

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