St. Kizito Clinic Primary Health Care Centre

25 Pages Posted: 17 Jun 2009

See all articles by Gerry Yemen

Gerry Yemen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

James G. Clawson

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business

Abstract

This case is useful for introducing the dynamics of not-for-profit marketing and organizational structuring. It reinforces the view of marketing as the range of activities involved in continuing to meet customer needs while generating value in return irrespective of the context—consumer, business-to-business, or nonprofit. It also demonstrates how charitable organizations could be funded as nonprofits but grow into revenue-generating organizations. St. Kizito Clinic in Nigeria had grown in the number of patient visits, number of services provided, and number of staff members since its inception 15 years earlier. The scope and quality of services were comparable to those provided by a number of competing secondary institutions. The clinic's location had evolved from a slum in a rural area to a slum in an urban area, leading to an increasing number of visits from the more affluent members of the surrounding communities. Medical Director Chiara Mezzalira, MD, faced the challenge of balancing the clinic's mission, which had as its primary audience the poor, the needy, and the underprivileged members of the society with environmental pressures wealthier clients presented. She was also mindful of the pressures from the clinic's Italian founder, the Association of Volunteers in International Services, to institutionalize proper management and accounting systems and reduce its financial dependence on the organization.

Excerpt

Lagos Business School

St. Kizito Clinic Primary Health care Centre

We started the St. Kizito Clinic as a charitable effort to provide basic health care services to the poor of the slum community of Ilasan, at the outskirts of Lagos, Nigeria. Over the years, the residents have come to recognise us as a provider of quality services that are affordable to the poor.

When we started, the Lekki Peninsula was largely underdeveloped. Today the story is different—the Lekki Peninsula has seen tremendous development with many residential housing estates for the middle- to upper-income end of society, as well as corporate organisations along this axis.

Our services are highly subsidised by donations, and I feel it is unfair for people who can afford to pay higher prices to pay these low fees. I do not want to charge discriminatory prices because of the potential for abuse as well as control. I do not want to institute a system that prevents genuine beneficiaries from receiving services. I have received proposals to charge the wealthy a different price but do not feel comfortable with this option due to the mission of the Associazione Volontari Servizio Internationale [AVSI], and the Catholic vision of man which is against treating different social classes of people. I do not want to be discriminatory in the way I treat the different income groups.

—Chiara Mezzalira, MD

. . .

Keywords: international, nonprofit, Nigeria, mission statement, organizational change, development, structure, Commonwealth English

Suggested Citation

Yemen, Gerry and Clawson, James G., St. Kizito Clinic Primary Health Care Centre. Darden Case No. UVA-OB-0908. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1421117

Gerry Yemen

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

James G. Clawson

University of Virginia - Darden School of Business ( email )

P.O. Box 6550
Charlottesville, VA 22906-6550
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.darden.virginia.edu/faculty/clawson.htm

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