The International Ban on Ivory Sales and its Effects on Elephant Poaching in Africa

Posted: 30 Jun 2009

See all articles by Andrew M. Lemieux

Andrew M. Lemieux

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Ronald V. Clarke

School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University

Date Written: July 2009

Abstract

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) secured an agreement in 1989 among its member states to ban the international trade in ivory. This disruption of the international ivory market was intended to reverse a sharp decline in the African elephant population, which resulted from widespread poaching for ivory in the previous decade. The continent's overall population of elephants increased after the ban, but an analysis of elephant population data from 1979 to 2007 found that some of the 37 countries in Africa with elephants continued to lose substantial numbers of them. This pattern is largely explained by the presence of unregulated domestic ivory markets in and near countries with declines in elephant populations.

Keywords: wildlife crime, elephants, ivory, poaching, CITES, situational crime prevention

Suggested Citation

Lemieux, Andrew M. and Clarke, Ronald V., The International Ban on Ivory Sales and its Effects on Elephant Poaching in Africa (July 2009). The British Journal of Criminology, Vol. 49, Issue 4, pp. 451-471, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1422383 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azp030

Andrew M. Lemieux (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

Ronald V. Clarke

School of Criminal Justice, Rutgers University ( email )

123 Washington Street
Newark, NJ 07102-309
United States

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