War Crimes Prosecutors and Intelligence Agencies: The Case for Assessing Their Collaboration

Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 93-120, 2001

Posted: 22 Jun 2009 Last revised: 11 Sep 2015

See all articles by Ian Bryan

Ian Bryan

Lancaster University

Michael Salter

University of Central Lancashire - Lancashire Law School

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

This research puts forward a case for reviewing recently declassified CIA materials on the role played by various US intelligence agencies in preparations for the Nuremberg war crimes trials. It suggests that any such review will uncover major issues regarding tensions between the ostensible goal of re-asserting the rule of law following Nazi atrocities committed during the Second World War, and the institutional means deployed by the relevant intelligence agencies to gather evidence for the prosecution of suspected offenders. The study makes a case for learning lessons from an increasing range of declassified sources that remain relevant for contemporary war crimes trials. However, it also acknowledges that the nature of intelligence agencies’ involvement in the investigation of more recent genocidal activities is likely to be classified for many years.

Suggested Citation

Bryan, Ian and Salter, Michael, War Crimes Prosecutors and Intelligence Agencies: The Case for Assessing Their Collaboration (2001). Intelligence and National Security, Vol. 16, No. 3, pp. 93-120, 2001, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1423825

Ian Bryan (Contact Author)

Lancaster University ( email )

Lancaster LA1 4YX
United Kingdom

Michael Salter

University of Central Lancashire - Lancashire Law School ( email )

Preston, PR1 2HE
United Kingdom

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
240
PlumX Metrics