Download this Paper Open PDF in Browser

Race and Domestic International Law in the United States

National Black Law Journal, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 26-51, 2003

25 Pages Posted: 10 Apr 2011  

Paul Finkelman

University of Pittsburgh, School of Law; Albany Law School - Government Law Center

Date Written: 2003

Abstract

This article explores how the 'Full Faith and Credit' Clause of Article IV affected state laws governing slavery and race before 1865 since states were not obligated to extend comity to laws which prejudiced the rights of their governments and of their citizens. However, the ease of interstate travel made slavery an issue for domestic international law. Two significant fugitive slave cases, Prigg v. Pennsylvania and Jones v. Van Zandt, held that race determined status, setting the law of slave states as the standard for American jurisprudence with fugitive slaves, free blacks in slave states, and slaves travelling through free states.

Suggested Citation

Finkelman, Paul, Race and Domestic International Law in the United States (2003). National Black Law Journal, Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 26-51, 2003. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1432029

Paul Finkelman (Contact Author)

University of Pittsburgh, School of Law ( email )

3900 Forbes Ave.
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
United States
412-648-2079 (Phone)

Albany Law School - Government Law Center ( email )

80 New Scotland Avenue
Albany, NY 12208
United States

Paper statistics

Downloads
32
Abstract Views
347