Explaining Ossification: An Examination of the Time to Finish Rulemakings

28 Pages Posted: 12 Aug 2009

See all articles by Stuart Shapiro

Stuart Shapiro

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

Date Written: August 11, 2009

Abstract

For decades, supporters of regulation have bemoaned the length of time it takes a federal agency to promulgate a final rule. This article uses a dataset of 435 regulations to examine first, how long the regulatory process actually takes, and second, what factors determine the length of time that it takes an agency to finish a regulation. I find that the number of comments that an agency receives on a proposed rule and whether the regulation is of general or particular applicability affect the length of time it takes to finalize a proposed rule (rules of general applicability take longer). Few of the regulatory procedures blamed for lengthening the regulatory process appear to have much of an actual effect on delaying regulations.

Keywords: regulations, rulemaking, bureaucracy, ossification

JEL Classification: K20, K23

Suggested Citation

Shapiro, Stuart, Explaining Ossification: An Examination of the Time to Finish Rulemakings (August 11, 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1447337 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1447337

Stuart Shapiro (Contact Author)

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy ( email )

New Brunswick, NJ 08901
United States

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