A General Approach to Causal Mediation Analysis

59 Pages Posted: 13 Aug 2009 Last revised: 26 Aug 2009

See all articles by Kosuke Imai

Kosuke Imai

Princeton University - Department of Political Science

Luke Keele

Pennsylvania State University

Dustin H. Tingley

Harvard University - Department of Government

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

In a highly influential paper, Baron and Kenny (1986) proposed a statistical procedure to conduct a causal mediation analysis and identify possible causal mechanisms. This procedure has been widely used across many branches of the social and medical sciences and especially in psychology and epidemiology. However, one major limitation of this approach is that it is based on a set of linear regressions and cannot be easily extended to more complex situations that are frequently encountered in applied research. In this paper, we propose an approach that generalizes the Baron-Kenny procedure. Our method can accommodate linear and nonlinear relationships, parametric and nonparametric models, continuous and discrete mediators, and various types of outcome variables. We also provide a formal statistical justification for the proposed generalization of the Baron-Kenny procedure by placing causal mediation analysis within the widely-accepted counterfactual framework of causal inference. Finally, we develop a set of sensitivity analyses that allow applied researchers to quantify the robustness of their empirical conclusions. Such sensitivity analysis is important because as we show the Baron-Kenny procedure and our generalization of it rest on a strong and untestable assumption even in randomized experiments. We illustrate the proposed methods by applying them to a randomized field experiment, the Job Search Intervention Study (JOBS II). We also offer easy-to-use software that implements all of our proposed methods.

Keywords: experiments, mediation, causal mechanisms, potential outcomes

Suggested Citation

Imai, Kosuke and Keele, Luke and Tingley, Dustin H., A General Approach to Causal Mediation Analysis (2009). APSA 2009 Toronto Meeting Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1450055

Kosuke Imai (Contact Author)

Princeton University - Department of Political Science ( email )

Corwin Hall
Princeton, NJ 08544-1012
United States

Luke Keele

Pennsylvania State University ( email )

Harrisburg, PA
United States

Dustin H. Tingley

Harvard University - Department of Government ( email )

1737 Cambridge Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Here is the Coronavirus
related research on SSRN

Paper statistics

Downloads
165
Abstract Views
1,065
rank
189,481
PlumX Metrics