Turning the Team Around: The Importance of Team Reflexivity Following Poor Performance

Proceedings of the Sixty-Eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management

31 Pages Posted: 20 Aug 2009 Last revised: 16 Dec 2009

See all articles by Michaéla Schippers

Michaéla Schippers

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Department of Technology and Operations Management

Astrid C. Homan

University of Amsterdam - Department of Work and Organizational Psychology

D.L. van Knippenberg

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR)

Date Written: August 18, 2009

Abstract

A small but growing body of literature adds to our understanding of performance spirals in teams. Initial performance is often highly predictive of later performance, which has the unfortunate implication that teams that initially perform poorly may experience great difficulties in improving their performance. We propose that teams that initially perform poorly can break the chain of poor performance when they engage in a process of team reflexivity (i.e., reflect upon their functioning), and that poorly performing teams benefit more from reflexivity than better performing teams. In a longitudinal study (N = 73 teams), we found support for this idea. As predicted, results further indicated that this interaction between initial team performance and team reflexivity was mediated by team learning. We outline how these findings are important for our understanding of team performance spirals as well as for the further development of team reflexivity theory.

Keywords: Team reflexivity, team learning, team performance

Suggested Citation

Schippers, Michaela and Homan, Astrid C. and Van Knippenberg, Daan, Turning the Team Around: The Importance of Team Reflexivity Following Poor Performance (August 18, 2009). Proceedings of the Sixty-Eighth Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1457368 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1457368

Michaela Schippers (Contact Author)

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) - Department of Technology and Operations Management ( email )

RSM Erasmus University
PO Box 1738
3000 DR Rotterdam
Netherlands

Astrid C. Homan

University of Amsterdam - Department of Work and Organizational Psychology ( email )

Weesperplein 4
Amsterdam, 1018 XA
Netherlands
+31 20 525 5955 (Phone)
+31 20 639 0531 (Fax)

Daan Van Knippenberg

Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR) ( email )

Burgemeester Oudlaan 50
3000 DR Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland 3062PA
Netherlands

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