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The Natural Resource Curse and Economic Transition

36 Pages Posted: 10 Sep 2009 Last revised: 18 Sep 2009

Michael Alexeev

Indiana University Bloomington - Department of Economics; Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration

Robert F. Conrad

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy; Duke University - Department of Economics

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Date Written: September 2, 2009

Abstract

Using cross-country regressions, we examine the relationship between “point-source” resource abundance and economic growth, quality of institutions, investment in human and physical capital, and social welfare (life expectancy and infant mortality). Contrary to most literature, we find little evidence of natural resource curse outside of the economies in transition. In the economies in transition, there is some evidence that natural resource wealth is associated with higher infant mortality. This negative effect, however, exists only relative to other resource rich countries. Compared to other economies in transition, natural resource abundant transitional economies are not worse off with respect to our indicators.

Keywords: economic transition, resource curse, institutional quality

JEL Classification: P27, P28, O13, Q32

Suggested Citation

Alexeev, Michael and Conrad, Robert F., The Natural Resource Curse and Economic Transition (September 2, 2009). CAEPR Working Paper No. 018-2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1471552 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1471552

Michael V. Alexeev (Contact Author)

Indiana University Bloomington - Department of Economics ( email )

Wylie Hall 105
Bloomington, IN 47405-6620
United States

Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration ( email )

pr. Vernadskogo, 84
Moscow, 119571
Russia

Robert F. Conrad

Duke University - Sanford School of Public Policy ( email )

201 Science Drive
Box 90312
Durham, NC 27708-0239
United States
919-613-7355 (Phone)

Duke University - Department of Economics

213 Social Sciences Building
Box 90097
Durham, NC 27708-0204
United States

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