The Effects of New Urban Rail Transit: Evidence from Five Cities

46 Pages Posted: 29 Jan 1999

See all articles by Matthew E. Kahn

Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Nathaniel Baum-Snow

University of Toronto - Rotman School of Management

Date Written: December 1998

Abstract

Many U.S cities invest in large public transit projects in order to reduce private vehicle dependence and to reverse the downward trend in public transit use. Using a unique panel data set for five major cities that upgraded their transit systems in the 1980s, we estimate new transit's impact on usage and housing values. New rail transit has a small impact on usage and housing values. High transit subsidization from non-local sources explains the continued push to build new rail transit lines. New transit's benefits are not uniformly distributed. We document which demographic groups are over represented in transit growth areas and the changes in transit usage by different demographic groups.

JEL Classification: H0, R4

Suggested Citation

Kahn, Matthew E. and Baum-Snow, Nathaniel, The Effects of New Urban Rail Transit: Evidence from Five Cities (December 1998). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=147271 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.147271

Matthew E. Kahn (Contact Author)

University of Southern California ( email )

2250 Alcazar Street
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Nathaniel Baum-Snow

University of Toronto - Rotman School of Management ( email )

105 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E6 M5S1S4
Canada

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
310
Abstract Views
2,075
rank
97,239
PlumX Metrics