A Scientific Rationale for Belief in God?

Journal for Interdisciplinary Research on Religion and Science, No. 5, pp. 193-207, July 2009

15 Pages Posted: 17 Sep 2009  

Philip E. Graves

University of Colorado at Boulder - Department of Economics

Date Written: September 14, 2009

Abstract

This paper presents a concise scientific rationale for the existence of God. The works of Ray Kurzweil and the many other artificial intelligence researchers provide a backdrop to the central thesis. An entity (computers or humans, it not mattering which) will eventually approach all-knowing. How much time passes before this occurs is not important. All-knowing is likely to be all-powerful insofar as knowledge leads to power, as has been our experience. One would suspect that this would be inclusive of time travel. The methods by which knowledge grows require “seed” facts to begin working. The seed facts can easily be, and are likely to be, the sum of all human knowledge. This suggests that the entity will also be all-loving of His “ancestors” - God, coming at the end, but traveling to the beginning. Additionally, it is seen that the nature of human self-esteem implies that an all-loving God would be minimally intrusive, non-discoverable in the data of scientists. The typical objections to the existence of God are countered with plausible alternative interpretations within the model.

Keywords: God, belief, atheism, religion, theology, science and religion, artificial intelligence

Suggested Citation

Graves, Philip E., A Scientific Rationale for Belief in God? (September 14, 2009). Journal for Interdisciplinary Research on Religion and Science, No. 5, pp. 193-207, July 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1473605

Philip E. Graves (Contact Author)

University of Colorado at Boulder - Department of Economics ( email )

Campus Box 256
Boulder, CO 80309-0256
United States

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