Prediction in Financial Markets: The Case for Small Disjuncts

23 Pages Posted: 6 Oct 2009

See all articles by Vasant Dhar

Vasant Dhar

New York University (NYU) - Leonard N. Stern School of Business; New York University (NYU) - Department of Information, Operations, and Management Sciences

Date Written: September 2009

Abstract

Predictive models in regression and classification problems typically have a single model that covers most, if not all, cases in the data. At the opposite end of the spectrum is a collection of models each of which covers a very small subset of the decision space. These are referred to as "small disjuncts." The tradeoffs between the two types of models have been well documented. Single models, especially linear ones, are easy to interpret and explain. In contrast, small disjuncts do not provide as clean or as simple an interpretation of the data, and have been shown by several researchers to be responsible for a disproportionately large number of errors when applied to out of sample data. This research provides a counterpoint, demonstrating that "simple" small disjuncts provide a credible model for financial market prediction, a problem with a high degree of noise. A related novel contribution of this paper is a simple method for measuring the "yield" of a learning system, which is the percentage of in sample performance that the learned model can be expected to realize on out-of-sample data. Curiously, such a measure is missing from the literature on regression learning algorithms.

Keywords: Small disjuncts, predictive modeling, Machine learning, Time series prediction, Financial markets

Suggested Citation

Dhar, Vasant, Prediction in Financial Markets: The Case for Small Disjuncts (September 2009). NYU Stern School of Business, Vol. , pp. -, 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1483480

Vasant Dhar (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) - Leonard N. Stern School of Business ( email )

44 West 4th Street
Suite 9-160
New York, NY NY 10012
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.stern.nyu.edu/~vdhar

New York University (NYU) - Department of Information, Operations, and Management Sciences

44 West Fourth Street
New York, NY 10012
United States

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