Long Work Hours: Volunteers and Conscripts

30 Pages Posted: 8 Oct 2009

See all articles by Robert W. Drago

Robert W. Drago

Pennsylvania State University - Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

David Black

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Abstract

Using panel survey data from Australia, we divide long hours workers (persons reporting usually working 50 or more hours per week) into groups of ‘volunteers’, who prefer long hours, and ‘conscripts’, who do not. We study both the static and dynamic prevalence of the phenomenon. Norms surrounding ideal workers and consumerism play major roles in explaining conscript status, with bargaining power less important. The self-employed often appear as volunteers or conscripts, while gender, rather than motherhood, is a strong predictor of shorter work hours. Both the demand and supply sides of the labour market play a role in explaining the prevalence of long hours conscripts.

Suggested Citation

Drago, Robert W. and Wooden, Mark and Black, David, Long Work Hours: Volunteers and Conscripts. British Journal of Industrial Relations, Vol. 47, Issue 3, pp. 571-600, September 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1484047 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2009.00717.x

Robert W. Drago (Contact Author)

Pennsylvania State University - Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations ( email )

University Park, PA 16802
United States
814-865-0751 (Phone)
814-863-3578 (Fax)

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

David Black

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

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