Self-Employment Matching: An Analysis of Dual Earner Couples and Working Households

Posted: 10 Nov 2009

See all articles by Lisa Farrell

Lisa Farrell

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Sarah Brown

affiliation not provided to SSRN

John G. Sessions

University of Bath; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: 2006

Abstract

The degree to which intra-couple and intra-householdfactors influence self-employment is investigated. After a review of theliterature on the relationship between household influences and employmenttype, data on 31,862 workers who participated in Great Britain's FamilyExpenditure Survey (FES) are used to determine how frequently individualswithin a couple or household are characterized by similar types ofemployment. Covering the period between 1996 and 2000, the data suggest that individualsare likely to group with other individuals with similar types of employment.This finding holds particularly true for self-employed individuals. Oneexplanation for these results is that the benefits from enhanced earnings forself-employed couples and households may be of sufficient magnitude to offsetthe incomes risks associated with self-employment. (SAA)

Keywords: Earnings potential, Households, Productivity, Human capital, Marital status, Interpersonal relations, Families, Employment patterns, Risk management, Self-employment

Suggested Citation

Farrell, Lisa and Brown, Sarah and Sessions, John G., Self-Employment Matching: An Analysis of Dual Earner Couples and Working Households (2006). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Academy for Entrepreneurial Leadership Historical Research Reference in Entrepreneurship, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1503278

Lisa Farrell

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Sarah Brown

affiliation not provided to SSRN

John G. Sessions

University of Bath ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA2 7AY
United Kingdom

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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