Women in Australian Prisons: The Cycle of Abuse and Dysfunctional Environments

The Prison Journal, Vol. 81, No. 1, pp. 87-112, 2001

26 Pages Posted: 19 Nov 2009 Last revised: 21 Jun 2018

See all articles by Patricia L. Easteal

Patricia L. Easteal

University of Canberra - School of Law and Justice

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

A significant proportion of Australian female inmates are drug addicts and women who have experienced violence as children and/or as adults. Ironically, the three rules (“don’t talk,” “Don’t trust,” and “Don’t feel”) that many therefore grew up with ironically are perpetuated within the prison institutional culture and structure. Many women are placed inappropriately in maximum security facilities that, due perhaps to the small population size relative to men, lack adequate employment, education, and rehabilitation. Comparison of results from empirical research conducted in the early 1990s with recent data reveals that although there have been some positive steps implemented, they have not greatly affected the dysfunctional women’s prison culture. The prisons for the most part continue to ignore the specific needs of women (and victims of violence). Thus, the tragic generational cycle of violence (crime-prison-violence-crime-prison-violence) persists.

Keywords: prison, violence

Suggested Citation

Easteal, Patricia L., Women in Australian Prisons: The Cycle of Abuse and Dysfunctional Environments (2001). The Prison Journal, Vol. 81, No. 1, pp. 87-112, 2001 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1508906

Patricia L. Easteal (Contact Author)

University of Canberra - School of Law and Justice ( email )

Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
2
Abstract Views
220
PlumX Metrics