The Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaboration

Southern Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 44, S, pp. 197-208, 2005

11 Pages Posted: 21 Nov 2009

Date Written: October 31, 2005

Abstract

In "How to Collaborate," Paul Thagard tries to explain why there is so much collaboration in science, and so little collaboration in philosophy, by giving an epistemic cost-benefit analysis. In this paper, I argue that an adequate explanation requires a more fully developed epistemic value theory than Thagard utilizes. In addition, I offer an alternative to Thagard's explanation of the lack of collaboration in philosophy. He appeals to its lack of a tradition of collaboration and to the a priori nature of much philosophical research. I claim that philosophers rarely collaborate simply because they can usually get the benefits without paying the costs of actually collaborating.

Keywords: Collaboration, Epistemic Value Theory, Social Epistemology, Procedural Knowledge, Scientific Research, Philosophical Research, Mathematical Research

Suggested Citation

Fallis, Don, The Epistemic Costs and Benefits of Collaboration (October 31, 2005). Southern Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 44, S, pp. 197-208, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1509182

Don Fallis (Contact Author)

Northeastern University ( email )

360 Huntington Ave,
Boston, MA 02115
United States

HOME PAGE: http://philpeople.org/profiles/don-fallis

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