Food Stamps, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and Food Hardships in Three American Cities

29 Pages Posted: 24 Nov 2009

See all articles by Richard DePolt

Richard DePolt

Wake Forest University

Robert A. Moffitt

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Economics; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

David Ribar

George Washington University - Department of Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Abstract

We examine how participation in the Food Stamp and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Programs is associated with self-reported household food hardships, using data from a longitudinal survey of low-income families living in Boston, Chicago and San Antonio. In addition to the measures of hardships and program participation, the survey includes measures of income, wealth, social resources, disability, physical health and family structure, measures that help us to account for selection between recipient and non-recipient households. For our multivariate analyses, we estimate multiple indicator multiple cause models that are modified to incorporate discrete outcome variables and to account for longitudinal data. Estimates from these models reveal that participation in the Food Stamp Program is associated with fewer food hardships, while participation in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program has no detectable association with hardships.

Suggested Citation

DePolt, Richard and Moffitt, Robert and Ribar, David C., Food Stamps, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and Food Hardships in Three American Cities. Pacific Economic Review, Vol. 14, Issue 4, pp. 445-473, October 2009. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1509754 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0106.2009.00462.x

Richard DePolt (Contact Author)

Wake Forest University ( email )

2601 Wake Forest Road
Winston-Salem, NC 27109
United States

Robert Moffitt

Johns Hopkins University - Department of Economics ( email )

Baltimore, MD 21218-2685
United States
410-516-7611 (Phone)
410-516-7600 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

David C. Ribar

George Washington University - Department of Economics ( email )

Monroe Hall, Suite 340
2115 G Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052 20052
United States
202-994-7608 (Phone)
202-994-6147 (Fax)

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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