Why the University of Michigan Should Win in Grutter and Gratz

8 Pages Posted: 22 Nov 2009

See all articles by F. Michael Higginbotham

F. Michael Higginbotham

University of Baltimore - School of Law

Kathleen A. Bergin

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: Spring 2003

Abstract

This article is written as if the writers were directly addressing the U.S. Supreme Court. They argue in favor of the admissions program of the University of Michigan in the light of the then undecided lawsuit of Grutter and Gratz against that institution. The case deals with the University's admissions process considering race as a factor in admissions decisions, and the petitioners making the argument that "even if diversity constitutes a compelling interest, the admissions programs nonetheless fail because they are not 'narrowly tailored.'" The writers make their case to point out why the petitioners' position is flawed.

Keywords: higher education, racial diversity, admissions programs, student diversity, narrow tailoring, Regents of the University of Californai v. Bakke, University of Michigan, Grutter and Gratz

JEL Classification: K19, K39, I28, I29

Suggested Citation

Higginbotham, F. Michael and Bergin, Kathleen A., Why the University of Michigan Should Win in Grutter and Gratz (Spring 2003). Louisiana Law Review, Vol. 63, No. 3, p. 697, 2003, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1510206 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1510206

F. Michael Higginbotham (Contact Author)

University of Baltimore - School of Law ( email )

1420 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21218
United States

Kathleen A. Bergin

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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