Europe United? The Impact of the EU’s Eastern Enlargement, Five Years on

26 Pages Posted: 23 Nov 2009

See all articles by Mark A. Pollack

Mark A. Pollack

Temple University - Department of Political Science; Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law

Date Written: November 22, 2009

Abstract

The ‘eastern enlargement’ of the European Union in 2004 and 2007 marked the unification of Western and Eastern Europe, yet many scholars feared negative consequences of enlargement - both for the institutions of the EU, which were expected to encounter gridlock in a Union of 27, and possibly for the new members themselves as the end of ‘conditionality’ might lead to backsliding on political or economic reforms. Despite these concerns, a growing body of EU scholarship has begun to explore both questions, and the results give substantial grounds for optimism. EU institutions have proven remarkably adaptable in the face of enlargement, while the new member states show little or no signs of backsliding, remaining committed to democracy, the rule of law and free markets.

Keywords: European Union, enlargement, central and eastern Europe, institutions, European Commission, Council of the European Union

JEL Classification: F02, K33

Suggested Citation

Pollack, Mark A., Europe United? The Impact of the EU’s Eastern Enlargement, Five Years on (November 22, 2009). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1511399 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1511399

Mark A. Pollack (Contact Author)

Temple University - Department of Political Science ( email )

461 Gladfelter Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States

Temple University - James E. Beasley School of Law ( email )

1719 N. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
United States

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