When Choosing is Not Deciding: The Effect Of Perceived Responsibility on Satisfaction

10 Pages Posted: 4 Dec 2009  

Simona Botti

London Business School

Ann L. McGill

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business

Date Written: July 28, 2006

Abstract

Prior research has found differences in satisfaction for choosers and nonchoosers of the same outcome. Two studies show that differentiability of the choice-set options moderates this effect. When options are more differentiated, choice enhances consumers' satisfaction with positive and dissatisfaction with negative outcomes; when options are iess differentiated, choosers experience the same level of satisfaction as nonchoosers, regardless of the option vaience. We test the hypothesis that the effect of outcome differentiability is due to differences in perceived responsibility and subsequent self-credit and self-blame for the decision outcome. A third study separates the effects of differentiability from random choice.

Suggested Citation

Botti, Simona and McGill, Ann L., When Choosing is Not Deciding: The Effect Of Perceived Responsibility on Satisfaction (July 28, 2006). Journal of Consumer Research, Vol. 33, 2006. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1516287

Simona Botti (Contact Author)

London Business School ( email )

Sussex Place
London, London NW1 4SA
United Kingdom
442070008646 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.london.edu

Ann L. McGill

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )

5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

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