Genetic Justice

The New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 352, No. 26, pp. 2667-2667, 2005

2 Pages Posted: 4 Dec 2009

See all articles by Mark A. Rothstein

Mark A. Rothstein

University of Louisville - Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law; University of Louisville - Louis D. Brandeis School of Law

Date Written: June 30, 2005

Abstract

On December 21, 2004, Brandon Moon was released from prison in El Paso, Texas, after having served 16 years of a 75-year sentence for three counts of aggravated sexual assault. Moon, who was 43 years of age at the time of his release, had been convicted in 1988 on the testimony of the three victims, who had had only a fleeting or partial view of their assailant. In 2004, after undergoing DNA testing, Moon was excluded as the contributor of the DNA collected after all three rapes. As a result, Moon became the 154th person in the United States to be exonerated on the basis of DNA evidence that came to light after the person was convicted for a crime.

Keywords: DNA testing, Criminal law, exoneration, forensics, genetics, innocence project, CODIS, DNA data banks

JEL Classification: K31, K32

Suggested Citation

Rothstein, Mark A., Genetic Justice (June 30, 2005). The New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 352, No. 26, pp. 2667-2667, 2005. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1517384

Mark A. Rothstein (Contact Author)

University of Louisville - Institute for Bioethics, Health Policy, and Law ( email )

Louisville, KY 40202
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.louisville.edu/bioethics

University of Louisville - Louis D. Brandeis School of Law ( email )

Wilson W. Wyatt Hall
Louisville, KY 40292
United States

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