Governing for Sustainable Coasts: Complexity, Climate Change, and Coastal Ecosystem Protection

Sustainability, Vol. 2, No. 5, pp. 1361-1388, 2010

FSU College of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 415

28 Pages Posted: 17 Dec 2009 Last revised: 2 Dec 2013

See all articles by Robin Kundis Craig

Robin Kundis Craig

USC Gould School of Law

J. B. Ruhl

Vanderbilt University - Law School

Date Written: May 17, 2010

Abstract

The world’s coastal ecosystems are among the most complex on Earth, and they are currently being governed unsustainably, by any definition. Climate change will only add to this complexity, underscoring the necessity of finding new ways to govern for these ecosystems’ sustainable use. After reviewing the problems facing coastal ecosystems and innovations in their governance, this article argues that governance of coastal ecosystems must move to place-based adaptive management regimes that incorporate innovative and flexible regulatory mechanisms, such as market-based incentives.

Keywords: sustainable, sustainability, coasts, coastal ecosystems, estuary, adaptive management, place-based management, ecosystem management, market-based, ecosystem services

Suggested Citation

Craig, Robin Kundis and Ruhl, J. B., Governing for Sustainable Coasts: Complexity, Climate Change, and Coastal Ecosystem Protection (May 17, 2010). Sustainability, Vol. 2, No. 5, pp. 1361-1388, 2010, FSU College of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 415, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1522949

Robin Kundis Craig (Contact Author)

USC Gould School of Law ( email )

699 Exposition Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90089
United States

J. B. Ruhl

Vanderbilt University - Law School ( email )

131 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203-1181
United States

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