Whither the Indian Union? Regional Disparities and Economic Reforms

Posted: 19 Dec 2009  

Michele Alessandrini

Independent

Tullio Buccellato

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Pasquale Scaramozzino

University of Rome II - Faculty of Economics; University of London - School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS); University of London - Centre for Financial and Management Studies (CeFIMS)

Date Written: December 1, 2008

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the process of convergence/divergence across Indian states. After surveying the main economic reforms implemented during the last decades in the Indian Union, we conduct an econometric study of the determinants of economic growth in the neoclassical frame of the Solow model. One of the main novel aspects of our convergence analysis is the attention paid to the spatial pattern of growth across Indian states. Making use of spatial econometric tools, we control for two different kinds of spatial interaction: distance and neighbourhood. Our results suggest that the gap between poor and rich states has constantly increased during the 1980s and the 1990s. Specifically, we find that winners were those states that benefited the most from the recent process of reform and liberalization, thanks also to their geographical advantage and to the presence of a developed service sector. Losers were instead the landlocked and highly populated states with a predominant agricultural sector and a low level of innovation.

Keywords: Regional inequality, economic growth, structural change, spatial effects, India

JEL Classification: C23, O18, O53, R11

Suggested Citation

Alessandrini, Michele and Buccellato, Tullio and Scaramozzino, Pasquale, Whither the Indian Union? Regional Disparities and Economic Reforms (December 1, 2008). Rivista Italiana degli Economisti, Vol. 3, December 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1525334

Michele Alessandrini (Contact Author)

Independent ( email )

No Address Available

Tullio Buccellato

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

Pasquale Scaramozzino

University of Rome II - Faculty of Economics ( email )

Via Columbia n.2
Rome, 00100
Italy

University of London - School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) ( email )

Thornhaugh Street
Russell Square: College Buildings 541
London, WC1H 0XG
United Kingdom

University of London - Centre for Financial and Management Studies (CeFIMS)

Thornhaugh Street
London, WC1H 0XG
United Kingdom

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