Not Available for Download

On the New Economic Policies Promoted by the 17th CCP Congress in China

The World Economy, Vol. 31, No. 9, pp. 1129-1153, 2008

Posted: 22 Dec 2009  

Shujie Yao

University of Nottingham

Stephen L. Morgan

University of Nottingham - School of Contemporary Chinese Studies; University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Faculty of Social Sciences; University of Melbourne - School of Historical Studies

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: December 20, 2009

Abstract

In late 2007, the Chinese Communist Party's 17th Congress outlined a programme of eight key economic policies to address future economic development in China. These policies emphasized 'building a harmonious society' using a 'scientific approach'. The paper assesses whether these policies are likely to help China achieve its target of quadrupling per capita GDP by 2020, while stemming the rise of inequality, finding sustainable alternatives to contemporary energy use, and solving various problems in governance, including the quality of party leadership and pervasive corruption.

Keywords: China, Economic reform, Economic development, Economic policy

JEL Classification: H11, O53, P21, P3

Suggested Citation

Yao, Shujie and Morgan, Stephen L., On the New Economic Policies Promoted by the 17th CCP Congress in China (December 20, 2009). The World Economy, Vol. 31, No. 9, pp. 1129-1153, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1526195

Shujie Yao

University of Nottingham ( email )

University Park
Nottingham, NG8 1BB
United Kingdom

Stephen Lloyd Morgan (Contact Author)

University of Nottingham - School of Contemporary Chinese Studies ( email )

Siyuan Bld, B06
University of Nottingham
Nottingham, NG8 1BB
United Kingdom
+44 115 82 32116 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/Chinese/people/s.morgan

University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Faculty of Social Sciences ( email )

199 Taikang East Road
Ningbo, 315100
China
+86 186-6780-2355 (Phone)

University of Melbourne - School of Historical Studies ( email )

200 Leicester Street
Melbourne, Victoria 3053
Australia

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
324