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The Economic Origins of 20th Century Decolonisation in West Africa

34 Pages Posted: 10 Mar 2010 Last revised: 1 Sep 2010

Johannes W. Fedderke

Pennsylvania State University - School of International Affairs

Nicola Viegi

University of Pretoria - Department of Economics

Julius Agbor

University of Cape Town (UCT)

Date Written: August 4, 2010

Abstract

This paper argues that the pattern of decolonisation was a logical consequence of the nature of human capital transfers from the colonisers to the elites of the former colonies, and this shaped the strategic interaction between these two groups. Where the educational practice emphasized the notion of assimilation, the system generally tended to produce elites that depended highly on the coloniser for their livelihood, hence necessitating a continuation of the imperial relationship even after independence was granted. On the contrary, where the practice emphasized the strengthening of the "solid elements" of the countryside, the system tended to produce a bunch of elites that were quite independent of the coloniser and consequently had little to loose from a disruption of the imperial relationship at independence. The results of the model shed light into why the French decolonisation process in West Africa was generally smooth and transited from colonialism to neo-colonialism whereas British decolonisations in West Africa were generally antagonistic, often culminating in complete independence from England. The paper contributes to existing knowledge by providing an alternative explanation of 20th century decolonisation, archored on human capital transfers, an approach which unifies both the Eurocentric and Afrocentric perspectives.

Keywords: Decolonisation, Human Capital Transfers, Eurocentrism, Afrocentrism, West Africa

JEL Classification: C7, F54, I2, N17

Suggested Citation

Fedderke, Johannes W. and Viegi, Nicola and Agbor, Julius, The Economic Origins of 20th Century Decolonisation in West Africa (August 4, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1530870 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1530870

Johannes W. Fedderke

Pennsylvania State University - School of International Affairs ( email )

Lewis Katz Building
University Park, PA 16802
United States

HOME PAGE: http://sia.psu.edu/faculty/johannes_fedderke

Nicola Viegi

University of Pretoria - Department of Economics ( email )

Pretoria 0002
South Africa

HOME PAGE: http://www.nviegi.net

Julius Agbor (Contact Author)

University of Cape Town (UCT) ( email )

Private bag Rondesbosch
Rondebosch
CapeTown, Western Cape 7701
South Africa

HOME PAGE: http://www.uct.ac.za

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