Color Minimization: The Theory and Practice of Addressing Race and Ethnicity at Work

38 Pages Posted: 7 Jan 2010

See all articles by Erica Gabrielle Foldy

Erica Gabrielle Foldy

New York University (NYU) - Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service

Tamara R. Buckley

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: Fall 2009

Abstract

A growing literature, largely experimental, is finding that color‐blindness inhibits interactions in racially diverse dyads or groups, while color cognizance, its opposite, enhances them. But little data documents how workers on the ground make sense of these dueling discourses. We draw on an intensive study of child welfare workers to suggest that one response may be “color minimization”: a perspective that acknowledges, but then downplays, the importance of race and ethnicity. While the study takes place in a setting where race and ethnicity are more salient than in many areas of employment, our findings have implications for a wide range of workplaces.

Suggested Citation

Foldy, Erica Gabrielle and Buckley, Tamara R., Color Minimization: The Theory and Practice of Addressing Race and Ethnicity at Work (Fall 2009). NYU Wagner Research Paper No. 2010-01. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1532302 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1532302

Erica Gabrielle Foldy (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) - Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service ( email )

The Puck Building
295 Lafayette Street, Second Floor
New York, NY 10012
United States

Tamara R. Buckley

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

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