When Planning is Not Enough: The Self-Regulatory Effect of Implementation Intentions on Changing Snacking Habits

Health Psychology, Vol 29, No. 3, pp. 284-292

UIC College of Business Administration Research Paper No. 10-01

31 Pages Posted: 12 Jan 2010 Last revised: 2 Jun 2010

See all articles by Leona Tam

Leona Tam

University of Wollongong - School of Management, Operations and Marketing

Richard P. Bagozzi

University of Michigan, Stephen M. Ross School of Business

Jelena Spanjol

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) - Faculty of Business Administration (Munich School of Management)

Date Written: January 12, 2010

Abstract

Objective: This study examined whether matching implementation intentions to people’s regulatory orientation affects the effectiveness of changing unhealthy snacking habits.

Design: Participants’ regulatory orientation was either measured (as a chronic trait) or manipulated (as a situational state), and participants were randomly assigned to implementation intention conditions to eat more healthy snacks or avoid eating unhealthy ones.

Main outcome measures: A self-reported online food diary of healthy and unhealthy snacks over a two-day period.

Results: Participants with weak unhealthy snacking habits consumed more healthy snacks when forming implementation intentions (regardless of match or mismatch with their regulatory orientation), while participants with strong unhealthy snacking habits consumed more healthy snacks only when forming implementation intentions that matched their regulatory orientations.

Conclusion: Results suggest that implementation intentions that match regulatory orientation heighten motivation intensity and put snacking under intentional control for people with strong unhealthy snacking habits.

Keywords: snacking habits, implementation intentions, regulatory fit, regulatory focus

Suggested Citation

Tam, Leona and Bagozzi, Richard P. and Spanjol, Jelena, When Planning is Not Enough: The Self-Regulatory Effect of Implementation Intentions on Changing Snacking Habits (January 12, 2010). Health Psychology, Vol 29, No. 3, pp. 284-292 ; UIC College of Business Administration Research Paper No. 10-01. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1535473

Leona Tam (Contact Author)

University of Wollongong - School of Management, Operations and Marketing ( email )

Building 40
Northfields Avenue
Wollongong, 2522
Australia

Richard P. Bagozzi

University of Michigan, Stephen M. Ross School of Business ( email )

701 Tappan Street
Ann Arbor, MI MI 48109
United States

Jelena Spanjol

Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (LMU) - Faculty of Business Administration (Munich School of Management) ( email )

Kaulbachstr. 45
Munich, DE 80539
Germany

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
191
Abstract Views
1,055
rank
158,312
PlumX Metrics