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Alienated: A Reworking of the Racialization Thesis after September 11th

26 Pages Posted: 3 Aug 2010  

Ming Hsu Chen

University of Colorado Law School; University of Colorado, Boulder - Political Science

Date Written: January 15, 2010

Abstract

This article revises widespread application of the racialization thesis to Arabs, Muslims, and South Asians following September 11. It suggests in its place an “alienation thesis” to describe the formation of an alien identity for those perceived and treated as noncitizens. This thesis draws on Asian American and critical race scholarship to re-interpret sociological understandings of the post-September 11 response to Arabs, Muslims, and South Asians. The article concludes that shifting conceptions of this phenomenon is critical to reforming “alienating” practices that function not only to cause harm to their intended targets, but also to distort the legal requirements of immigration law and equality jurisprudence.

Keywords: race, immigration, Asian American, September 11

Suggested Citation

Chen, Ming Hsu, Alienated: A Reworking of the Racialization Thesis after September 11th (January 15, 2010). American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law, Vol. 18, No. 3, p. 101, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1537258

Ming Hsu Chen (Contact Author)

University of Colorado Law School ( email )

University of Colorado, Boulder - Political Science ( email )

1070 Edinboro Drive
Boulder, CO 80309
United States

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