Mothering, Diversity and Peace Politics: A Critical Analysis of Sara Ruddick's Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace

Hypatia, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 188-198, Spring 1994

11 Pages Posted: 26 Jan 2010

See all articles by Alison Bailey

Alison Bailey

Illinois State Universtiy, College of Arts and Sciences - Philosophy Department

Date Written: Spring 1994

Abstract

The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue that if maternal arguments do no address the variety of relationships race and class have to institutional violence and to the military, then maternal peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's description of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill Collins's account of U.S. Black women's "motherwork." The paper also addresses the essentialist aspects of Ruddick's account.

Keywords: Mothering, Peace, essentialist accounts, race and mothering, Sara Ruddick, Patricia Hill Collins

Suggested Citation

Bailey, Alison, Mothering, Diversity and Peace Politics: A Critical Analysis of Sara Ruddick's Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace (Spring 1994). Hypatia, Vol. 9, No. 2, pp. 188-198, Spring 1994 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1541553

Alison Bailey (Contact Author)

Illinois State Universtiy, College of Arts and Sciences - Philosophy Department ( email )

412 Stevenson Hall (4540)
Illinois State University
Normal, IL 61790-4540
United States
309.438.5617 (Phone)

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